Family History Research

Wisdom Wednesday – Attend a Schaumburg Library Genealogy Meeting

Are you new to genealogy research and live in the Chicagoland area? Are you an experienced researcher looking for great programming and speakers? Then you will want to check out the Genealogy Group at the Schaumburg Township District Library

Last night a friend and I attended the Genealogy Group meeting for the first time. Neither of us are new to genealogy and we both have experience working with genealogy societies. What we witnessed was amazing! Tony, the librarian who runs the group, is a one man genealogy society in the library. He works approximately 9-10 hours a week and runs the Genealogy Group by himself, the way an entire society board would run a group.

You can read the full extent of what Tony does at Chicago Genealogy at Examiner.com.

What was really impressive is something I have never seen at genealogy society meetings. Tony provided all new attendees, regardless of how long they have been researching with a thick folder full of information. This folder even included a genealogy book. I have never seen a genealogy society provide new members with this much information. What did I receive last night?

  • A handout entitled “A Genealogy Intro” written by Dick Eastmann.
  • A book by a fellow colleague in DuPage County, Jeffrey Bockman, entitled “Give Your Family A Gift That Money Can’t Buy.”
  • Information on the upcoming National Genealogical Society conference with a note that says, “What you can expect to find at a national conference.”
  • Brochure of printed and online genealogy resources.
  • An information sheet about the Genealogy Group and resources online through the blog and library.
  • A huge packet called “Beginning Guide and Research Tips.” Tony’s business card is stapled to the front page so you can contact him with questions.
  • A copy of the Genealogy Group’s surname and locale research list. All new attendees are encouraged to complete this form so connections can be made with other researchers. Sharing information is not required though.
  • The Schaumburg Township District Library’s Genealogy Audiovisual Materials Guide.

I was so impressed with the meeting and the handouts that I encourage everyone to attend the next Genealogy Group meeting in Schaumburg. Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of the month. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. and the meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. Meetings end by 9:30 p.m. and the library closes at 10:00 p.m.

 

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Seen the 99+ Genealogy Things Meme?

I was just reading a post on Kinexxions about the 99+ Genealogy Things Meme. Have you seen it?  Below is the list Becky posted. What have you done? Are there any you would add to her list?

Comment below and check out the Kinexxions blog!

The list should be annotated in the following manner:
Things you have already done or found: bold face type
Things you would like to do or find: italicize (color optional)
Things you haven’t done or found and don’t care to: plain type

  1. Belong to a genealogical society.
  2. Researched records onsite at a court house.
  3. Transcribed records.
  4. Uploaded tombstone pictures to Find-A-Grave.
  5. Documented ancestors for four generations (self, parents, grandparents, great-grandparents) .
  6. Joined Facebook.
  7. Helped to clean up a run-down cemetery.
  8. Joined the Genea-Bloggers Group on Facebook.
  9. Attended a genealogy conference.
  10. Lectured at a genealogy conference.
  11. Spoke on a genealogy topic at a local genealogy society.
  12. Been the editor of a genealogy society newsletter.
  13. Contributed to a genealogy society publication.
  14. Served on the board or as an officer of a genealogy society.
  15. Got lost on the way to a cemetery.
  16. Talked to dead ancestors.
  17. Researched outside the state in which I live.
  18. Knocked on the door of an ancestral home and visited with the current occupants.
  19. Cold called a distant relative.
  20. Posted messages on a surname message board.
  21. Uploaded a gedcom file to the internet.
  22. Googled my name.
  23. Performed a random act of genealogical kindness.
  24. Researched a non-related family, just for the fun of it.
  25. Have been paid to do genealogical research.
  26. Earn a living (majority of income) from genealogical research.
  27. Wrote a letter (or email) to a previously unknown relative.
  28. Contributed to one of the genealogy carnivals.
  29. Responded to messages on a message board or forum.
  30. Was injured while on a genealogy excursion.
  31. Participated in a genealogy meme.
  32. Created family history gift items (calendars, cookbooks, etc.).
  33. Performed a record lookup for someone else.
  34. Went on a genealogy seminar cruise.
  35. Am convinced that a relative must have arrived here from outer space.
  36. Found a disturbing family secret.
  37. Told others about a disturbing family secret.
  38. Combined genealogy with crafts (family picture quilt, scrapbooking).
  39. Think genealogy is a passion not a hobby.
  40. Assisted finding next of kin for a deceased person (Unclaimed Persons).
  41. Taught someone else how to find their roots.
  42. Lost valuable genealogy data due to a computer crash or hard drive failure.
  43. Been overwhelmed by available genealogy technology.
  44. Know a cousin of the 4th degree or higher.
  45. Disproved a family myth through research.
  46. Got a family member to let you copy photos.
  47. Used a digital camera to “copy” photos or records.
  48. Translated a record from a foreign language.
  49. Found an immigrant ancestor’s passenger arrival record.
  50. Looked at census records on microfilm, not on the computer.
  51. Used microfiche.
  52. Visited the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.
  53. Visited more than one LDS Family History Center.
  54. Visited a church or place of worship of one of your ancestors.
  55. Taught a class in genealogy.
  56. Traced ancestors back to the 18th Century.
  57. Traced ancestors back to the 17th Century.
  58. Traced ancestors back to the 16th Century.
  59. Can name all of your great-great-grandparents.
  60. Found an ancestor’s Social Security application.
  61. Know how to determine a soundex code without the help of a computer.
  62. Used Steve Morse’s One-Step searches.
  63. Own a copy of Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills.
  64. Helped someone find an ancestor using records you had never used for your own research.
  65. Visited the main National Archives building in Washington, DC.
  66. Visited the Library of Congress.
  67. Have an ancestor who came over on the Mayflower.
  68. Have an ancestor who fought in the Civil War.
  69. Taken a photograph of an ancestor’s tombstone.
  70. Became a member of the Association of Graveyard Rabbits.
  71. Can read a church record in Latin.
  72. Have an ancestor who changed their name.
  73. Joined a Rootsweb mailing list.
  74. Created a family website.
  75. Have more than one “genealogy” blog.
  76. Was overwhelmed by the amount of family information received from someone.
  77. Have broken through at least one brick wall.
  78. Visited the DAR Library in Washington D.C.
  79. Borrowed a microfilm from the Family History Library through a local Family History Center.
  80. Have done indexing for Family Search Indexing or another genealogy project.
  81. Visited the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
  82. Had an amazing serendipitous find of the “Psychic Roots” variety.
  83. Have an ancestor who was a Patriot in the American Revolutionary War.
  84. Have an ancestor who was a Loyalist in the American Revolutionary War.
  85. Have both Patriot & Loyalist ancestors.
  86. Have used Border Crossing records to locate an ancestor.
  87. Use maps in my genealogy research.
  88. Have a convict ancestor who was transported from the UK.
  89. Found a bigamist amongst the ancestors.
  90. Visited the National Archives in Kew.
  91. Visited St. Catherine’s House in London to find family records.
  92. Found a cousin in Australia (or other foreign country).
  93. Consistently cite my sources.
  94. Visited a foreign country (i.e. one I don’t live in) in search of ancestors.
  95. Can locate any document in my research files within a few minutes.
  96. Have an ancestor who was married four times (or more).
  97. Made a rubbing of an ancestors gravestone.
  98. Organized a family reunion.
  99. Published a family history book (on one of my families).
  100. Learned of the death of a fairly close relative through research.
  101. Have done the genealogy happy dance.
  102. Sustained an injury doing the genealogy happy dance.
  103. Offended a family member with my research.
  104. Reunited someone with precious family photos or artifacts.
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Follow Friday – August 19, 2011

My friend Laura, an archivist, started a new blog this week called The Last Leaf on this Branch. Check her out! I think you will find her blog interesting.

Also be sure to read the Fountaindale Library’s post about next week’s Family History Writing class. It’s free. Live in the area of Bolingbrook, IL? Sign up. I’ll be there!

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Lesson 6 of NGS HSC

Antonia and Josef Subrt in Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago

Wednesday was a whirlwind day of genealogy research and travel all over Chicagoland. I started my day at Bohemian National Cemetery and looked up some graves for a couple of clients. One client’s family was buried in Section 15. I knew I had family there but couldn’t remember who off the top of my head until I walked in one corner of the section and there were my great grandparents, Anna and Frank Brouk. Said good morning to them and walked on looking for the client’s family.

Passed by my great great grandparents Josef and Antonia Subrt and a few cousins from the Vit, Kratky and Oul/Aul families. At the opposite end of the section from my Brouk family were the client’s family.

My next stop was across the street at IRAD. Did you know the meters there are 30 minutes only? Yep! Thankfully I had a list of two marriage certificates I wanted and knew I needed a couple examples of 1871-ish licenses for my NGS HSC assignment. The IRAD intern was almost 10 minutes late, leaving me 20 minutes to finish, pay for my copies and run back to the car. I did it! Gave the intern the dates and numbers of the certificates and he quickly pulled the films. I asked for a roll with 1871-ish certificates and he gave me that as well.

Now all that is left to do is scan in those licenses I copied and finish my assignment. I hope to accomplish this tonight or tomorrow morning. Once I submit it I will have five lessons to go!  Progress is exciting!

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